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See absolutely everything that's going on at The Castle Cinema, by date.

Fri, 25 May

Mary and the Witch's Flower (English Version)

From Hiromasa Yonebayashi, animator on such Studio Ghibli masterpieces such as Ponyo and Spirited Away, comes a dazzling new adventure. Based on Mary Stewart‘s 1971 classic children’s book The Little Broomstick, Mary and the Witch's Flower is packed with jaw-dropping imagination and ingenious characters.

Mary is an ordinary young girl stuck in the country with her Great-Aunt Charlotte and seemingly no adventures or friends in sight. She follows a mysterious cat into the nearby forest, where she discovers an old broomstick and the strange Fly-by-Night flower, a rare plant that blossoms only once every seven years and only in that forest. Together the flower and the broomstick whisk Mary above the clouds, and far away to Endor College – a school of magic! But Mary discovers that all is not as it seems in this fantastical world, and soon Mary must confront great danger and call on her courage if she is to save the day.

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Sat, 26 May

Mary and the Witch's Flower (English Version)

From Hiromasa Yonebayashi, animator on such Studio Ghibli masterpieces such as Ponyo and Spirited Away, comes a dazzling new adventure. Based on Mary Stewart‘s 1971 classic children’s book The Little Broomstick, Mary and the Witch's Flower is packed with jaw-dropping imagination and ingenious characters.

Mary is an ordinary young girl stuck in the country with her Great-Aunt Charlotte and seemingly no adventures or friends in sight. She follows a mysterious cat into the nearby forest, where she discovers an old broomstick and the strange Fly-by-Night flower, a rare plant that blossoms only once every seven years and only in that forest. Together the flower and the broomstick whisk Mary above the clouds, and far away to Endor College – a school of magic! But Mary discovers that all is not as it seems in this fantastical world, and soon Mary must confront great danger and call on her courage if she is to save the day.

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Sun, 27 May

Mary and the Witch's Flower (English Version)

From Hiromasa Yonebayashi, animator on such Studio Ghibli masterpieces such as Ponyo and Spirited Away, comes a dazzling new adventure. Based on Mary Stewart‘s 1971 classic children’s book The Little Broomstick, Mary and the Witch's Flower is packed with jaw-dropping imagination and ingenious characters.

Mary is an ordinary young girl stuck in the country with her Great-Aunt Charlotte and seemingly no adventures or friends in sight. She follows a mysterious cat into the nearby forest, where she discovers an old broomstick and the strange Fly-by-Night flower, a rare plant that blossoms only once every seven years and only in that forest. Together the flower and the broomstick whisk Mary above the clouds, and far away to Endor College – a school of magic! But Mary discovers that all is not as it seems in this fantastical world, and soon Mary must confront great danger and call on her courage if she is to save the day.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

Mon, 28 May

Mary and the Witch's Flower (English Version)

From Hiromasa Yonebayashi, animator on such Studio Ghibli masterpieces such as Ponyo and Spirited Away, comes a dazzling new adventure. Based on Mary Stewart‘s 1971 classic children’s book The Little Broomstick, Mary and the Witch's Flower is packed with jaw-dropping imagination and ingenious characters.

Mary is an ordinary young girl stuck in the country with her Great-Aunt Charlotte and seemingly no adventures or friends in sight. She follows a mysterious cat into the nearby forest, where she discovers an old broomstick and the strange Fly-by-Night flower, a rare plant that blossoms only once every seven years and only in that forest. Together the flower and the broomstick whisk Mary above the clouds, and far away to Endor College – a school of magic! But Mary discovers that all is not as it seems in this fantastical world, and soon Mary must confront great danger and call on her courage if she is to save the day.

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Tue, 29 May

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

Wed, 30 May

Mary and the Witch's Flower (English Version)

From Hiromasa Yonebayashi, animator on such Studio Ghibli masterpieces such as Ponyo and Spirited Away, comes a dazzling new adventure. Based on Mary Stewart‘s 1971 classic children’s book The Little Broomstick, Mary and the Witch's Flower is packed with jaw-dropping imagination and ingenious characters.

Mary is an ordinary young girl stuck in the country with her Great-Aunt Charlotte and seemingly no adventures or friends in sight. She follows a mysterious cat into the nearby forest, where she discovers an old broomstick and the strange Fly-by-Night flower, a rare plant that blossoms only once every seven years and only in that forest. Together the flower and the broomstick whisk Mary above the clouds, and far away to Endor College – a school of magic! But Mary discovers that all is not as it seems in this fantastical world, and soon Mary must confront great danger and call on her courage if she is to save the day.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

Thu, 31 May

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Fri, 1 Jun

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Sat, 2 Jun

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

Sun, 3 Jun

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

Natalie Evans & Katie Malco

Teaming up with Young/Dead Promotions to bring you an intimate performance from the beguiling multi-instrumentalist/singer Natalie Evans, with support from wonderful guitarist/songwriter Katie Malco.

Natalie blends the intricate stylings of 1960's/70's pastoral English folk with the experimental melodic/technical sensibilities of Mid-West Emo and contemporary Math-Rock. An incredibly accomplshed guitar player, harpist, pianist, composer and singer - Natalie is out on tour on the back of her new album 'Better at Night', out may 25th on Small Pond Records.

Katie Malco is another staple of the U.K underground scene - having previously supported Tubelord, Rueben and Julien Baker with her instantly recognisable brand of lo-fi acoustic folk.

Young/Dead is a queer/female focusing promotions company based in East London who have to date run shows for diverse artists such as Chagall van den Berg, Loraine James, Bibi Bellatrixx, Ghosts You Echo, Yvonne McDonnell, Sam Ashton, Ella CR, All Cats Are Beautiful, Nnja Riot, Sol Flare + many more.

Tickets are £5 adv / £6 on the door.

Mon, 4 Jun

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Tue, 5 Jun

Jeune Femme

First-time filmmaker Léonor Serraille and the dazzling Laetitia Dosch burst onto the scene with Jeune Femme, a raucous and playful portrait of a woman in her early 30s in Paris. Following in the footsteps of Frances Ha and Fleabag, it’s a sometimes heartbreaking, often hilarious and always relatable nod to the chaos and candour of modern life.

Neurotic and manic, bold and magnetic, Paula (Dosch) is a muddle of contradictions. Fresh from an unceremonious dumping by her boyfriend of 10 years, she finds herself wandering the streets of Paris – jobless, homeless and single – with no idea of what life holds for her next. At 31 years old, with little to show for it but a kidnapped cat and a sense of adventure, she sets out to reinvent herself – new job, new friends, new life – and finds that these things never do come easily.

Testament to the talent of its nearly all-female filmmaking crew, Jeune Femme picked up the coveted Camera d’Or prize for best first feature at the Cannes Film Festival 2017. Anarchic, complicated and undeniably charming, this is the French hot-mess heroine we’ve long been waiting for.

On Chesil Beach

Adapted by Ian McEwan from his bestselling novel, the drama centers on a young couple of drastically different backgrounds in the summer of 1962. Following the pair through their idyllic courtship, the film explores sex and the societal pressure that can accompany physical intimacy, leading to an awkward and fateful wedding night.

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Wed, 6 Jun

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Thu, 7 Jun

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

Pitchblack Playback: Bon Iver - For Emma, Forever Ago

Hear Bon Iver's heartache-inducing debut album loud, in full, in the dark at Pitchblack Playback's first listening session at The Castle. Kick back on one of our extra comfy seats, put on your free blindfold and settle into a meditative state.

As recommended by The Guardian, GQ, Time Out, Metro, Newsweek, New Statesman and The Londonist.

This is an album listening session, not a live performance.

Doors 9pm
Playback starts 9.30pm

With thanks to Secretly Group.

Fri, 8 Jun

Concealed

Winner of 8 international Film Awards, including Best Picture at the Liverpool International Film Festival and Best Cinematography at the Orlando International Film Festival, Concealed is a thriller like no other. It's set in the underbelly of Sydney’s inner city suburbs where Max (Simon Lyndon) and his mate Richard (Paul Tassone) are desperately trying to find Sallie, Max’s partner who's disappeared. Their search takes them deep into the criminal heartland of the city and even deeper inside the secrets and lies of family.

Make sure you don’t miss this Festival Favourite if you love Australian thrillers like Animal Kingdom and Chopper.

Performance notes:
Fri 1st - Premiere + afterparty
Fri 8th - Q&A with Director Shane Hall

The End

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